Lieutenant Colonel Merryn J P O’Gorman, Imperial War Museum Collection
Colin Harding selected this photograph from the Imperial War Museum in The Commons on Flickr, for this month’s Flickr Favourites. 
"I have chosen this competent but uninspiring portrait because of who the sitter is. Born in Ireland, Mervyn O’Gorman (or ‘O.G.’ as he was affectionately known) is best known as one of the greatest British aeronautical engineers. During the First World War he was head of the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. He was also a motoring pioneer, writing O’Gorman’s Motoring Pocket Book in 1904, and was actively involved in the Royal Automobile Club, becoming its vice-president. He also later played a key role in the introduction of the Highway Code.
"O’Gorman was an artist as well as an engineer, concentrating on etching and lacquer-work. He was also a talented photographer. A charming and humorous man with enormous physical and mental energy, he seems to have been almost universally liked and admired. His obituary in The Times summed him up as ‘A man of agile mind and Hibernian eloquence’.
"O’Gorman was an early exponent of colour photography, using the Autochrome process. I included some of his Autochromes in an exhibition I curated in 2007 which celebrated the centenary of the Autochrome process. O’Gorman’s portrait of his daughter, Christina, photographed on the beach at Lulworth Cove, Dorset in 1913 and now part of The Royal Photographic Society Collection held here, is simply stunning.”

Lieutenant Colonel Merryn J P O’Gorman, Imperial War Museum Collection

Colin Harding selected this photograph from the Imperial War Museum in The Commons on Flickr, for this month’s Flickr Favourites

"I have chosen this competent but uninspiring portrait because of who the sitter is. Born in Ireland, Mervyn O’Gorman (or ‘O.G.’ as he was affectionately known) is best known as one of the greatest British aeronautical engineers. During the First World War he was head of the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. He was also a motoring pioneer, writing O’Gorman’s Motoring Pocket Book in 1904, and was actively involved in the Royal Automobile Club, becoming its vice-president. He also later played a key role in the introduction of the Highway Code.

"O’Gorman was an artist as well as an engineer, concentrating on etching and lacquer-work. He was also a talented photographer. A charming and humorous man with enormous physical and mental energy, he seems to have been almost universally liked and admired. His obituary in The Times summed him up as ‘A man of agile mind and Hibernian eloquence’.

"O’Gorman was an early exponent of colour photography, using the Autochrome process. I included some of his Autochromes in an exhibition I curated in 2007 which celebrated the centenary of the Autochrome process. O’Gorman’s portrait of his daughter, Christina, photographed on the beach at Lulworth Cove, Dorset in 1913 and now part of The Royal Photographic Society Collection held here, is simply stunning.”